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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 29, 2017 4:00pm-5:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm reeta chakrabarti. the headlines at four. a retired appeal courtjudge will lead the public inquiry into the grenfell tower fire — he says it may not be as wide—ranging as some residents hope. the residents and the local people want a much broader investigation i can fully understand what they would want that. whether my enquiry is the right way in which to achieve that am doubtful. the 4pm deadline passes — with the parties in northern ireland failing to reach a deal to restore power—sharing. a senior member of the vatican, cardinal george pell, is charged with sexual abuse offences in his home country, australia. i'm simon mccoy live in westminster where mps will vote on the queen's speech later. it's been interpreted as a test of authority for theresa may's minority government —— labour is seeking amendments on public spending and brexit. good afternoon and
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welcome to bbc news. sir martin moore—bick — the retired judge chosen to lead the public inquiry into the grenfell tower fire — says it's unlikely its remit would be wide enough to satisfy all survivors. sir martin promised a "vigorous inquiry‘ that would look at the problems surrounding the start of the fire and its rapid development in order to prevent this ever happening again. after meeting with residents this morning — he said he understood their desire forjustice and that he would produce an interim report "as early as possible". critics say residents should have been consulted. 80 people are now presumed by police to have died. here's our correspondent richard lister. the family and friends of tony disson gathered for his funeral today, a short distance from grenfell tower where he died. with an estimated 80 dead, there
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will be many more such funerals. looming over them, questions about why they died, who was to blame, how can others be protected. and this is the man now appointed to find the answers, sir martin moore—bick. ajudge for 20 years before he died from the court of appeals, he focused on complex technical cases in the commercial courts. he's promised to consult grenfell survives about how to proceed. they have my greatest sympathy. having said that, i'm absolutely determined that this enquiry will be open and full and will cover all the ground so we reach inclusions that a reliable and can prevent anything happening like this again. we need to be part of every single decision made. but those who escaped grenfell tower that night have demanded more input into shaping this process. they appear not to have been consulted about this appointment. i understand this has to be fair
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and impartial but i believe the victims of this, you know the tower victims first, evacuees second and local residents thirdly should be the ones leading this and deciding what direction this inquiry takes and what remit it has. and a decision by sir martin moore—bick involving westminster city council is also causing grenfell survivors concern. he backed the decision to move a single mother of five to social housing 50 miles away. if i was speaking to families, i would be saying that on its own tells you nothing. the problem is we don't know what the broader record is. setting up the public inquiry was always going to be a delicate process. grenfell survivors are being asked to work with the establishment they feel let them down for decades. the aim is for an interim report this summer. with me is the barrister richard jacobs qc who has worked
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with sir martin moore—bick, and appeared before him while he was on the bench. thanks for coming in, what is he like? extremely courteous, one of the nicest people you could ever hope to meet. i have never known him to be angry or cross about anything. he is an extremely high regarded lawyer, very efficient as far as i can tell, he has all the necessary qualities to carry out what will be a very difficult exercise. how will he cope given previous decisions he has taken and the way he has been appointed? he has been appointed to he will get on with the job. it is not a matter for him he will get on with the job. it is not a matterfor him if he will get on with the job. it is not a matter for him if the government thought it needed to
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consult with people before making an appointment, that is an appointment for the government. it was clear from the start this would be the judge led assembly so it is finding the rightjudge judge led assembly so it is finding the right judge if judge led assembly so it is finding the rightjudge if this is the route the rightjudge if this is the route the government is going to go down. as to how he will cope, he only gets one shot at doing these, he is an extremely intelligent and capable man andi extremely intelligent and capable man and i would have thought he would cope as well as anyone. quite a lot has been made of this case where he ruled in favour of westminster council moving an individual who is in the care of the borough many miles from the actual borough many miles from the actual borough itself and i think the inferences, he is somebody you will not be very sympathetic towards
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local people? i had a look at the decision, the issue for him and his fellow judges decision, the issue for him and his fellowjudges in the court of appeal is whether or not the council have taken appropriate steps whether a particular individual should be moved outside the borough. he thought the council have taken the right steps and he thought the decision was ok, the supreme court took a different view. if in fact you look at the judgment of the court of appeal you will see that he is very sympathetic to the pressures on councils as well as individuals.
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i suppose another pressure on him all the time because people to not wa nt all the time because people to not want this to be an enquiry that drags on and on and on. that's right. you have to remember if you are in the court of appeal was she was for about 12 years, there are not that many judges was for about 12 years, there are not that manyjudges who are dealing with them and i was say he is one of the most efficient people which wasn't the case of sir martin moore—bick that you're waiting months forjudgments, moore—bick that you're waiting months for judgments, you moore—bick that you're waiting months forjudgments, you would get them quite quickly so i would regard him as an efficient person. thank you for coming in. in the last few minutes the deadline for politicians in stormont to restore power—sharing has passed. the government has been under pressure on the issue since agreeing with the deal with the dup. this came after an amendment was selected for debate on the queen ‘s speech.
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the tories will be seeking approval for the overall programme after a week of debate. labour has tabled an amendment to the juice elements of its own manifesto. the previous labour amendment was defeated in the commons last night after the democratic unionists voted with the conservatives. a piece of parchment setting out the government's policy plans. written by ministers, read by the queen at the formal opening of parliament last week. my ministers are committed to working with parliament, the devolved administrations, business and others, to build the widest possible consensus on the country's future outside the european union. but now there's a hung parliament that consensus will be hard to achieve, notjust on brexit, but other measures, too. the one vote the government is confident of winning, today's, when mps will be asked to approve the queen's speech. i'm confident it will go through.
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we set out a programme in the national interest, delivering on brexit and other important domestic matters and i think that is important to deliver that said the government can get on governing as the people of britain would expect us to do. the ayes to the right 309. the noes to the left 323. yesterday the government saw off the challenge by labour. they tried to amend the queen's speech, to get more investment in public services and the scrapping of the cap on public sector pay. but whilst some tories hinted at their concerns over austerity... it's time for us to think again about the impact of the public sector pay cap. none were willing to undermine the prime minister on such a key vote. today, labour will try again with another amendment. we are putting forward fundamentally what was in our manifesto in the election. a brexit that guarantees trade relations with europe. a government that ends the public sector pay cap.
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and a government that invests in the education future of all of our children from nursery through to university. despite labour's efforts to tease open any divisions within the conservative party over austerity, it's highly likely that theresa may's queen's speech will get through the commons today. tory mps won't risk challenging her authority on this. and she has the support of ten democratic unionist mps with whom she did a deal to get their backing on key votes. but even with that, the prime minister's majority is slim and labour will seek to exploit that at every opportunity. parliament's likely to see some brutal battles over the next two years. backbenchers will be emboldened, every vote will count in getting anything through, and it won't be plain sailing. our chief political correspondent vicki young is inside parliament's central lobby. not plain sailing, a different kind
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of politics many people are saying? yes and backbenchers are emboldened on both sides. they think because an amendment was put down by labour mp to make sure that women coming from northern ireland and travelling to england and wales for an abortion can have that pay for. that is not the case and the government has decided that they will find that. there will be other amendments put down to the queen speak in an hour oi’ down to the queen speak in an hour or $0. down to the queen speak in an hour or so. i'm joined by down to the queen speak in an hour orso. i'mjoined by wes down to the queen speak in an hour or so. i'm joined by wes streeting, it isa or so. i'm joined by wes streeting, it is a hung parliament and things are different to the parliament he left before the election? different dynamics and different numbers, today has been the government foos first real test of the limited majority. the amendment put forward
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by stella creasy around access to an abortion is not one that would be supported by the conservatives new friends but nonetheless one that commands the support of the vast majority and the government know they would have been defeated without that. that is the opportunity of the parliament, to work across party lines and build a consensus where work across party lines and build a consensus where maybe the government would not want that, it does make this parliament a bit more interesting than the one i left a few months ago. on the issue of consensus, few months ago. on the issue of consensus, the main bulk of the queen ‘s speech is about brexit, where amendment is being put down about remaining in the single market and the customs union when we leave, you are presumably backing that's how much support do you think there is across the house? quite a lot for the principle that britain should
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keep all of its options open when it con‘ies keep all of its options open when it comes to membership of the single market and the customs union, the role of parliament, whether or not we see a role of parliament, whether or not we see a majority of mps voting for that today i very much doubt. the mood music amongst conservative colleagues had my own labour colleagues, this is not one where they would stick their neck out. people have voted to leave the european union, we understand that and get that there really big choices within that framework and i think were we to leave the single market and the customs union then we would be sacrificing our national interest. when i spoke to people who voted leave, i think most of them, they thought the membership has delivered economic benefits which has not been at the top of their concei'ns. has not been at the top of their
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concerns. the official line from labour is that you should be abstaining on that amendments, are you going to defy the leadership? abstaining on that amendments, are you going to defy the leadership7m is not about defying the leadership forjeremy corbyn, but at a similar amendment down in the last parliament and i want to stick with my convictions. it is about acknowledging that there are differences in opinion, not least because we represent constituents and many represent constituents who wanted to leave. there will be differences of opinion, it is not about us versus the leadership were each other but about sticking to what we believe to those in the national interest. compromise all round from all sides back to simon.
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let's talk to caroline lucas who was a co—signature of the stella creasy amendment on the rights of women in northern ireland to come to england and getan northern ireland to come to england and get an abortion on the nhs so is this a new type of politics, there isa this a new type of politics, there is a positive side of the government as you is a positive side of the government as you can see. is a positive side of the government as you can see. this was a great climb down from the government and a great victory for backbenchers working collectively across party together. to see the government fall at this hurdle demonstrates how weak they are, they are lurching from one disaster to the next with the other side of that of course means that backbenchers feel a renewed confidence and the sense that we can work together to get things done. now you say the government fall at the first, some would say the government is having to listen, it has no choice but to listen and act, isn't that what everybody would like
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to see chris mac on this issue you are rightand to see chris mac on this issue you are right and it is remarkable it had to have this amount of pressure to force the government to deliver basic human rights to all of its citizens. you shouldn't have too have come to the brink as they did on have come to the brink as they did on this amendment. when it comes to brexit there is still a risk that they will pursue an extreme brexit so they will pursue an extreme brexit so it is more important people work across the party to combat that. i'm not sure we'll have the same success but it does mean that that collective work will be more important than ever. do you see the battle... is absolutely the issue of the pay cap will not go away and the vast majority of the public really support lifting that pay cap. they can see support lifting that pay cap. they can see the loss of morale and the unfairness that ha rd—working can see the loss of morale and the
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unfairness that hard—working nhs staff are struggling after several yea rs of staff are struggling after several years of the pay cap about nurses being dependent on food banks. when money is needed, the famous military can be found and shakers i think the whole government narrative has been shown to be the truth is always was. you spoke about the need for a new type of politics, is this what we are now type of politics, is this what we are now seeing, it is being forced on are now seeing, it is being forced on the government of the votes in this house, every single one will matter, every single backbencher will be taken into account under the a way this has never happened before? you're right, by accident there is now an opportunity for a different type of politics. people know across the country the votes we i’e know across the country the votes were translate into seats across parliaments and therefore the
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cross— party parliaments and therefore the cross—party working with up and one that had been designed by the people rather than being found by accident. i don't think theresa may has a mandate for the kind of brexit she still think she can perceive. her manchild nothing has changed is getting more and more ridiculous as the days go by. how long do you give her? by the end of the year. that fight happening at five, caroline lucas is going now to enter the lobbies. in the last few minutes downing street has confirmed talks to restore devolved power—sharing stormont will carry on until monday. it has therefore care without any agreement, we cannot speak to theresa villiers was the northern
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ireland secretary between 2011—16. thank you forjoining us, the northern ireland secretary spoke a little earlier and said that significant progress had been made in these talks and he sounded optimistic, is that optimism fair?|j think optimistic, is that optimism fair?” think so, he is on the inside and we are not, from what i can gather the talks between the parties have been very intense and from late into the night, that to me signals that there isa night, that to me signals that there is a degree of determination on a different size to try and get an agreement. the outstanding issues, one agreement. the outstanding issues, one of the key outstanding issues is an act on the irish language, do you think that sort of thing is surmountable? i believe it is, this has been a sensible issue for a long time in northern ireland because
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theseissues time in northern ireland because these issues are on identity and culture and they have become politicised in at negative way often. arlene foster and the dup are trying to reach out on these matters, trying to find a way forward so and it is right to say the two sides might be able to accommodate on language. do you know why this might be casting a shadow with the dup over storm once?” why this might be casting a shadow with the dup over storm once? i do think that is a key factor. from my experience in these negotiations, whether they succeed or fail ultimately comes down to the wishes of the two biggest parties in northern ireland, if they want to make it work they will make it work and if not they want. many times in the past, labour have had a
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long—standing relationship in parliament and that didn't stop him for example playing a huge role in the process i think it is a separate issue and doesn't necessarily have two. the role of arlene foster, they said they couldn't work with her if they remain head of the party. they have said that that they also have occasionally said that they do need to recognise the democratic mandate of the dup. it is not clear but what is happening is a public enquiry into the green energy scandal which caused. the fact these questions
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will be fully ventilated i hope the cysts power—sharing again. will be fully ventilated i hope the cysts power-sharing again. we can go live to stormont and chris page. another deadline comes and goes extending the man —— monday, what are the chances of a realistic resolution? something all parties agree on resolution? something all parties agree on is the outstanding issues that can be sorted out quickly if there is a political will put the two biggest parties, the dup and sinn fein blame each other for the deadlock. you heard earlier today the dup negotiator coming forward and confirming there would be no deal today, several hours ahead of the deadline, he said ministers would not be there and said sinn
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fein had been given instructions. you had, murphy accusing the dup of anti—equality, anti—rights agenda so both of the two biggest parties set is each other's faults. sinn fein wants a piece of legislation to protect irish but the dup want broader legislation. there are other issues to, for example same—sex marriage, the dup are imposed to bring its thin but sinn fein wanted to be introduced. the demand for a bill of rights is also being resisted,. i will ask you the same
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question, there had been fears that the westminster dup and the continued presence of eileen foster as the leader would cast a long shadow over the talks but for what you're saying they don't seem to have? it has not been a help or hindrance to the negotiations said, conor murphy did say that they thought the alliance, the dup take a different attitude and they have said what is not to like about £1 billion extra coming into northern ireland over the next two years, it should incentivise sinn fein. it is about those rights —based
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dishes on language and same—sex marriage and the bill of rights. chris will be back with you on monday to see what happened, until then many thanks. one of the pope's closest advisors, cardinal george pell, has been charged in his native australia with historical sexual offences against children. at a press conference this morning the cardinal insisted he was innocent of the charges — and said he looked forward to having his day in court. our correspondent james reynolds reports from rome. this morning in st peter's square, the cardinals of the catholic church turned out for a celebration led by the pope, but one of their number was missing. cardinal george pell appeared instead in a vatican press room to respond to the charges made the australian police. i'm innocent of these charges. they are false. the whole idea of sexual abuse is abhorrent to me. so i'm very grateful
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to the holy father for giving me this leave to return to australia. today victoria police have charged cardinal george... earlier in australia, the police outlined the charges against the 76—year—old cleric. cardinal pell is facing multiple charges in respect of historic sexual offences, and there are multiple complainants relating to those charges. for more than a0 years, george pell worked as a priest, then an archbishop in his own country. in 2014, pope francis called him to work in rome. in february last year the cardinal testified via video link to an australian commission investigating official responses to child abuse. victims flew in to watch his testimony. now the cardinal will have to defend himself in court. the charges leave the church and the pope in an uncomfortable position. after his election, francis created
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a commission to deal with allegations of sexual abuse by clerics. now he finds that one of his closest advisers faces charges of his own. the pope will now face questions about his ally. cardinal george pell will appear in court in australia next month. james reynolds, bbc news. the culture secretary karen bradley says she is ‘minded' to refer rupert murdoch's 21st century fox bid to take control of sky to the competition commission. ms bradley pointed to concerns about media plurality — but has yet to make her final decision. mr murdoch already owns 39 percent of sky and opponents believe the deal would give him too much power in the uk media. our entertainment correspondent david silito reports. sky, 12 million of us subscribe. it was set up by rupert murdoch but he owns only 39% of the shares. he wants full control.
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however, his media empire also owns the sun and the times and produces news for many radio stations. should this be a matter for the competition authority? the culture secretary asked the watchdog ofcom for its assessment of the deal. ofcom's report is unambiguous. it concludes, "the transaction raises public interest concerns as a result of the risk of increased influence by members of the murdoch family trust over the uk news agenda and the political process. with its unique presence on radio, television and in print and online. we consider that these concerns may justify reference by the secretary of state to the competition and markets authority". on the basis of ofcom's report, i confirm that i am minded to refer to a phase two investigation on the grounds of media plurality. plurality essentially means, does one media owner have too much political power? opponents of the murdoch empire were today protesting, saying exactly that. but they also fear that other
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concerns about past misdeeds won't be taken into consideration. we feel rupert murdoch has too much power and he is a dangerous man. read a full investigation before we hand him any more of our media. and so a takeover bid that was first proposed seven years ago is still not settled. but for the murdoch family, sky was their creation. it almost bankrupted them in the 90s before they turned it into the success of today. the battle is still very much on to finally make it theirs. david sillito, bbc news. time for a look at the weather prospects. good afternoon a pretty miserable afternoon across scotland with heavy and persistent rain as you can with heavy and persistent rain as you can see with heavy and persistent rain as you can see her, it is creeping its
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way westward into northern ireland. we're so have light rain and drizzle across some parts, it is windy as well which has brought a real chilly field to things. this evening and overnight, it stays largely dry, might seea overnight, it stays largely dry, might see a shower or two and a lot of cloud in london and norwich, it is going to be a wet start today and will be wet down the west side, gradually the rain is sinking southwards and eastwards, it weakens off in the process of the show two added that the generally speaking should be trying the south—eastern coi’nei’. should be trying the south—eastern corner. the rain moves through bert bigger deal brighter. hello. this is bbc news.
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the headlines: a retired appeal courtjudge who's been chosen to lead the public inquiry into the grenfell tower fire has expressed doubt that it will be broad enough to satisfy the concerns of the survivors. the residents and the local people want a much broader investigation and i can fully understand why they would want that. whether my inquiry is the right way in which to achieve that, i am more doubtful. we will show that full interview. that's in a few minutes. the dup says there will not be a breakthrough to restore power sharing in northern ireland by today's deadline at apm. downing street has confirmed the talks will be allowed to extend until monday. one of the most senior figures in the catholic church who is accused of multiple counts of sexual abuse, the vatican treasurer cardinal george pell, says he'll take a leave of absence to fight the charges in australia. and a test of authority for theresa may's minority
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government as mps are set to vote on the queen's speech later, with three amendments to be voted on, including proposals calling for an ‘end to austerity‘. time now for a look at the sport news. many thanks. good afternoon. we'll start with tennis. british number one johanna konta looks to be finding some form on grass ahead of wimbledon, after reaching the quarter finals at eastbourne following her victory over the french openjelena ostapenko. the briton took the first set 7—5 against her latvian opponent. some big winners by both players and it was the grand slam champion who levelled the match by taking the second, before world number seven konta saw her opponent off in the decider. 6—4 the score this time. the briton now faces world number one angelique kerber in the last eight this evening. the british number two heather watson is also through. she beat the 14th seed anastasia pavlyuchenkova in straight sets.
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6—4, 6—3 the score. in the men's draw, novak djokovic is into the semi finals after a straight sets win over the american donald young. the world number four took the first set 6—2 but young was far tougher in the second set, taking it to a tie break and pushing djokovic all the way. the serbian took it 11—9 in the end to reach the last four. concerns linger over the fitness of the world number one andy murray after his wuthdrawl from an exhibition event at london's hurlingham club tomorrow. murray, the reigning wimbledon champion and top seed for next week's tournament, has cited a sore hip. he'd already pulled out of facing the frenchman lucas pouille on tuesday, he hasn't been able to train today and says he is also unlikely to be able to practice tomorrow. england strikerjermain defoe has rejoined bournemouth on a three year deal, after leaving sunderland. a release clause in his contract meant the 34—year—old was available as a free transfer, following sunderland's relegation from the premier league.
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he was on loan with bournemouth in the 2000—2001 season, scoring in ten consecutive games for them. defoe scored 15 league goals last season, earning him a recall to the england squad in march after a four year absence from the national side. the sale of defoe's former club sunderland is off. chairman ellis short says it "would not be in the best interests" but he will continue his financial commitment to the club. meanwhile, preston north end have granted their manager simon grayson permission to speak to sunderland about the vacant manager's job. grayson has been at deepdale for four years and is the tenth longest serving manager in england. warren gatland, the british and irish lions head coach, says he's had to make some tough calls for the ‘must win‘ second test against new zealand in wellington on saturday. jonny sexton will start in the pivotal fly half role with owen farrell moved to inside centre, while ben te'o drops to the bench. maro itoje will start in the second row with last weekend's captain peter o'mahony is replaced as skipper and in the flank by sam warburton.
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i am delighted with the selection for this week. it has probably been the most nervous i have been, going into the selection meeting this week. i was not sure what was going to happen. some of the guys were brilliant on tuesday. they could have come straight into the team. that happened last week. i was very nei’vous about the selection. about the direction. but i am absolutely delighted i am going to be starting the series. holders england have named their squad for the women's rugby world cup in ireland later this summer. bristol's sarah hunter, who led the team to the six nations grand slam earlier this year, will again skipper the side with emily scarratt as vice captain. 28 players have been called up in total. england will begin their pool b campaign against spain on the 9th of august. great britain's mahama cho matched the best ever result for a british man at the world taekwondo championships with silver in the heavyweight division. cho had looked in great form reaching the final
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but was was unable to contain olympic silver medallist abdoul issoufou of niger who claimed his maiden world title with a 9—4 win. we'll have more in the next hour. let's get more now on today's commons vote by mps on the queen's speech, which will see an attempt by labour to introduce elements of their general election manifesto. simon mccoy is in westminster ahead of the vote. thank you. we have got our finger on the pulse. these are pictures of theresa may leaving downing street. are you hanging on? prime minister? that question says it all. it is a question if she can retain power,
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and with the support of the dup, the government is expected to pass these plans. but it is not going to be easy. that is true of any vote. with me is david cowling, the visiting research fellow at king's college london. the mathematics, tight. we have already seen that the government has had to bend to an amendment, backbenchers causing problems? we are going to get this with every vote ? are going to get this with every vote? yes. the backbenchers are going to see the strength. conservative backbenchers are going to wa nt conservative backbenchers are going to want to achieve a lot in terms of favourite projects, but if they meet the government do u turns, the government is england to look to be weak. and the electorate has been tough on governments that looked to be weak. it is a difficult part, to get what they want to get without seeming to make the government look
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impotent. and lose jobs? and lose jobs. we were talking to the welsh parties and scottish parties earlier, suggestion that if all of the welsh members and scottish mps got together with labour, then they could outnumber the government.“ you take the dup out of this, the conservatives have 370 members. all of the combined members, excluding the dup, 308. that is a majority for the dup, 308. that is a majority for the conservatives of nine. and the other twist. the speaker does not vote, or the deputies. other twist. the speaker does not vote, orthe deputies. one other twist. the speaker does not vote, or the deputies. one of them isa vote, or the deputies. one of them is a conservative, and to have come from labour. with the dup, the
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working majority of 20. every team theresa may gets into a intoa carto into a car to come here, she'll wonder is this the moment i lose? trading the part of the labour party, in the 1970s. the james callaghan government. and then the brutal period, the conservatives we i’e brutal period, the conservatives were ruthless, forcing votes, raids, everybody had to be in the house of commons. people in strictures comnig in. tough and rough. nerve-wracking if you are government. but a renewal for many backbenchers, who could have argued that they had been utterly ignored. all of them, becoming vital players, intense of getting substantial numbers of opposition to be available, telling
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party leaders i will be available. i would like this to happen. and on the government side, you have already identified backbenchers have got the backbencher parliament. overall this, you have got brexit. nobody can guarantee the vote for that? that is something that deeply divides the house. and also the economic consequences divides the house. and also the economic consequences of brexit, for the government the dilemma has to be settled but if the economy does not improved, they are going to be facing an electric, vote for us, we'll be economy is not doing well. the government has got negotiations to sort out but also has to hope and pray the economy picks up. the opposition, hammering on the door.
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whatever happens in this house of commons, it is going to matter to individuals in that building, in a way that it never has before? yes. backbencher parliament. getting authority, in a way that over the last couple of decades they probably thought they did not have. what that does for the future, she is not telling us, as my wife would say! the vote in 20 minutes. because of the amendments, we could get the result after six o'clock. back to you. the retired judge heading the inquiry into the grenfell tower fire says he is "doubtful" the process will be as wide—ranging as some residents hope. sir martin, who is 70, has been meeting residents of grenfell this morning. he said he understood their "desire for justice". it is an enormous tragedy and i can honestly say i have never seen anything like that building,
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that is now completely gutted, you can see through it in many places. it is very difficult, even having heard from former residents, to understand what a terrifying experience it must have been to be in that building without any obvious means of escape as the smoke started to rise. they have got my greatest sympathy. having said that, i am absolutely determined that this inquiry is going to be open, full, and cover all of the ground so that we can reach reliable conclusions and prevent anything like this happening again. i have been asked to undertake this inquiry on the basis that it would be pretty well limited to the problems surrounding the start of the fire and the rapid development, in order to make recommendations as to how this sort of thing can be prevented in the future.
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now, i am well aware that residents and the local people want a much broader investigation, and i can fully understand why they want that. whether my enquiry is the correct way to achieve that, i am more doubtful. i will give that some thought and make a recommendation. what we could have... other ways for that desire for an investigation to be satisfied. i would hope to be able to answer the basic factual questions, such as how did this fire start, spread, how did it engulf the whole of the building at such speed? and also, what internal precautions were there? what steps were available for alerting residents, allowing them to escape? the question about you being the man correct for thisjob... you will have seen
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coverage this morning. a housing decision you made in the appeals court. controversial was the word. i was surprised to see myself described as controversial. the case, it is one of many i have presided over as a judge. i have been a judge for over 20 years. and particularly with the court of appeal, you deal with an enormous range of work, involving local government, central government, and one simply reaches the conclusion that you think is right, applying the law as you see it. that's the work of a judge. 137 high rise buildings have now failed safety tests on cladding in 41 local authority areas,
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according to the latest government figures. four of those tower blocks are in the london borough of camden, where residents from over 600 flats have been told to leave because of fire safety concerns. our correspondent tom burridge has been meeting some of the people who are still living in the chalcots estate, despite being told to leave nearly a week ago. michelle's family are facing a difficult dilemma. they've been told to leave theirflat in north london. because their tower block has suspect cladding and after the fire at grenfell, failed an inspection by the london fire brigade. but camden council has still not found michelle suitable alternative accommodation and so she has reluctantly been sleeping in her flat. i don't want to stay in that flat. i mean, last night, my husband refused to stay in it. i stayed in there with my daughter. and at two o'clock i woke up having a panic attack because i heard a bang. ithought, i know they're starting works.
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ijust don't understand it. there are people still here trying to find somewhere to stay. i can't tell you the emotional impact it's having on everyone, including myself. i've never been in this terrible state like this before. panic attacks and everything. it's just so awful. michelle, like others we met, doesn't blame the council. it says it is doing all it can to rehouse the most vulnerable people first in appropriate accommodation as close to here as possible. but sean henry was offered a flat with nothing in it and that simply didn't work for his family. well, at this point i don't have an option. i need to make sure my family is safe. and until i get the appropriate or suitable accommodation, i'm going to stay put. because right now this is the safest place. even though it has been deemed unsafe. this man has a four—year—old daughter with a serious blood disease and a seven—year—old son with severe autism. the hotel they were in wasn't appropriate for his children. i'm not looking for luxury.
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looking for somewhere to cook, clean, you know, clean ourselves, basically. wash ourselves. and sleep. and we can cope somehow. so, like others, he spent the day at the local leisure centre. well, it's roughly five hours since we met him earlier, and he's been inside chatting to council officials and it still seems they haven't been able to find him and his family anywhere appropriate to live. later, though, he was told that they had been allocated a flat nearby. this is a relief. i can bring his playstation, his toys. his book shelves. woohoo! so, it's a struggle for a semblance of normal life, when you're suddenly told your home is not safe, amidst a national scandal about how so many buildings in britain have been built. tom burridge, bbc news, in camden. in a moment a look at how the financial markets
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in europe closed the day, but first the headlines on bbc news: the retired judge who will lead the public inquiry into the grenfell tower fire says he's ‘doubtful‘ that it will be as wide—ranging as some residents hope. talks to restore powersharing at stormont will be allowed to extend until monday, after this afternoon's 4pm deadline was missed. mps will vote on the queen's speech later. labour is seeking amendments on public spending and brexit. hello. now a look at how the markets in europe have ended the trading session. the ftse 100 is now in negative territory for the first time today. staying there. health care and consumer stocks are weighing heaviest on the index, which is outweighing gains in banking shares today. hsbc has been a big gainer today after morgan stanley upgraded its rating on the stock. mining stocks have also done well today, helped by higher metal prices.
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not much of an affect on the overall index. supermarket tesco and wholesaler booker have asked the uk competition regulator to fast—track its probe into their proposed £3.7 billion tie up. tesco announced it had agreed to buy booker in january and the competition and markets authority started an initial review in late may. the firms now want the cma to move "more quickly". the cma is assessing whether the proposed grocery tie—up could reduce choice for shoppers and for small stores supplied by booker. rolls royce say 7,000 jobs in the east midlands are secure following their announcement on a £150 million investment in uk operations. its investing the majority of that cash into a test bed in derby that will create 200 jobs. it's also gone back on a decision to close a facility down in the area, which will save 150 jobs. unite the union are pleased with the decision. and the culture secretary said
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she is "minded to" refer rupert murdoch's 21st century fox takeover of sky to the competition watchdog. karen bradley's decision is a blow to the media mogul‘s hopes of having the £11.7 billion deal waved through without further scrutiny. we can get more detailed analysis. we can get more detailed analysis. we can get more detailed analysis. we can start by looking at fox and sky. share price of sky doing well. reflecting investors? up 396. in the grand scheme of things, after this announcement came out, we realised we we i’e announcement came out, we realised we were not going to get the conservative majority after the election and investors basically believing this would be waved through. in the grand scheme of things, the thoughts of the
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government today are what are some a lot to what they said in 2011 when this was originally planned. shelved after the news of the world hacking scandal. still the belief that this is going to go through, it could ta ke is going to go through, it could take six months but obviously issues around carrara the —— locality —— plularity in the media, possibly more regulated moving forward, but it isa more regulated moving forward, but it is a delay for fox, and report mother, but certainly not a cancellation. rolls-royce. 7000 jobs secui’e. cancellation. rolls-royce. 7000 jobs secure. £150 million investment. it is positive. a significant amount of money? it certainly is. when we talk
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about a british company creating jobs, investing in britain, especially in this post brexit world, it is something to be positive about. rolls—royce is one of the largest technical exporters that the united kingdom has. all of the factories and investment around this new engine, going on that airbus a350, 1600 of them on order. this is going to be ticketed item, export and around the world. the government needs to make sure that investment is still being channelled into this, regardless of the trade deal that we eventually sign with the eu, us, china, we have goods to sell. and tesco. they want to cma to get a move on. reflective of how
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confident they think this result is going to be? i think so. issues with competition around this. anybody in a major metropolitan area, knows that you get a fair amount of tesco metros. they would be taking over booker, outnumber ten to one sainsbury‘s. that is what the cma will look at. i think it is eventually going to go through after this to be delay. thank you. that's all from me, there is a roundup of all the other top business stories on our website. some news from the metropolitan police, a 52 year rd man has been arrested on suspicion of fraudulently pretending to get
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money, after claiming that he had lost fa m ily money, after claiming that he had lost family members in the aftermath of the recent disaster, that he had lost his wife and son. the police said his story had inconsistencies, and it was established that the man does not have a wife or a child. the detective superintendent said that the distress and suffering caused to so the distress and suffering caused to so many families that evening is harrowing, the police are not interested in investigating subletting, immigration matters, but they will investigate when anybody looks to capitalise on the suffering of so many. air pollution is a huge problem in cities around the world, and it affects the health of millions. now a german company has developed a piece of nature inspired technology, which it thinks could help. it makes so—called ‘city trees‘, which it's been rolling out from london to hong kong. dougal shaw reports from hamburg, germany. in common with many other european cities, hamburg in germany likes to dress up the urban concrete
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jungle with a bit of greenery. but what if that greenery could be supercharged to clean up air pollution? that‘s the idea of an it expert turned gardener and entrepreneur called liang wu. his start—up has designed what it calls city trees, urban structures that fight air pollution by harnessing the power of moss. normally found in forests, moss is able to grow without soil. this makes it naturally adapted to take what it needs from the air. the moss can store all the pollution particles and then just uses it as nutrients and grows with the pollution. moss is particularly good at filtering out what scientists call particulate matter, microscopic particles of pollution in the air. in cities, it comes from car exhausts, tyre friction and factories. some are known to penetrate the lungs and are linked to cancer. a city tree is also a live digital data point for mapping global pollution. but all this comes at a price.
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a normal tree costs around $900 over a decade. the cost of a city tree is $28,000. but the inventors say, when it comes to cleaning up air pollution, a city tree is equivalent to 275 normal trees, and their cost is usually picked up by corporate sponsors. but not everyone is convinced that this is the best way to tackle urban air pollution. it‘s really hard to get pollution out of the air once is already in it. it‘s like trying to take the milk out of your cup of tea. would we be much better off spending the money on actually cleaning up the exhausts of the vehicles that are travelling around us? but after a little over two years and 25 city trees and counting, this start—up is hoping it can persuade people it is a smart way to clean up city air in a meaningful way. this is the scene in the house of commons where mps are about to vote
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on the queen‘s speech. first test of theresa may‘s minority government. more on the news at five. it has been pretty miserable across the north and west of the united kingdom. this was from edinburgh. a road! big puddles. rain to north wales. but that has not beenin to north wales. but that has not been in and gloom. confirmation of a wet day for scotland. the radar showing extensive rain, and ahead of that we have got some drizzle across england, also weigh in scotland. that is coming from the north sea,
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chilly out there. a lot of low cloud. grey night. mild. 10 degrees for stornoway, 1a for london. at the morning, it is good to be wet for the south west of england, but in the south west of england, but in the east, dribs and drabs. generally speaking, dry. rather cloudy. for more england, some extensive low cloud. grey start. weight for northern ireland, and northern scotland. even the central lowlands. grey start. low cloud. but things are going to slowly improve for northern ireland and western scotland, that rain should ease and region off in the process. showers in the east. 23 for london. 1a,
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aberdeen. warmerfor today in the east. 23 for london. 1a, aberdeen. warmer for today but still below par four aberdeen. warmer for today but still below parfourjune. aberdeen. warmer for today but still below par fourjune. that rain aberdeen. warmer for today but still below parfourjune. that rain is going to go through the south east on going to go through the south east on friday evening and overnight we get the high pressure and that is going to give us a decent start for the weekend. some sunshine, 23 degrees for london, and aberdeen, dating to about 16, 17. saturday night into sunday, and on sunday it is good to be similar to saturday. dry, bright, breezy. some good opportunities for getting out and about. it is going to be that drier and brighter. for some of us, warmer. it‘s 5pm.
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we‘re at westminster, where mps are about to vote on the content of the queen‘s speech. are you hanging on, prime minister? the prime minister left for the commons a short while ago. there‘s a series of votes about the take place. it‘s being seen as a key test of theresa may‘s authority. we‘ve set out a programme in the national interest, delivering on brexit and a number of important domestic matters, and i think it‘s important to deliver that so the government can get on with governing. this is the scene in the house of commons, where labour want to amend the government‘s programme, especially on brexit and the economy. we‘re putting forward fundamentally what was in our manifesto in the election, a brexit that guarantees trade relations with europe, a government that ends the public sector pay cap.

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